Deadman








Deadman
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DEADMAN can best be summed up by the mythological story of the Phoenix; a great bird that burns fiercely to ashes from

which a new, stronger life emerges. But let's start at the beginning....

At the turn of the century, acclaimed producer Mark Howard (U2, Bob Dylan, Daniel Lanois, Lucinda Williams), signed on to

produce the first two of DEADMANs records, "Paramour" (2001) and "Our Eternal Ghosts" (2004). The Dallas based band,

included lead singer, Steven Collins' then wife, on harmony vocals. Steven recalls, “Mark focused on expanding the sound into a

soundscape. Traditional production was replaced by sonic exploration in the realm of the traditional song structure. We never

thought about “singles” or “radio songs” we just concentrated on making a unique piece of art. On Eternal Ghosts, Mark

gravitated toward the softer, hymn-like songs that gave the record its unique identity. We might have missed that without him

being there.”

The band has garnered critical acclaim and industry attention, including such honors as Billboards Independent Music World

Series Award as well as radio tastemaker support from stations including KCRW: Morning Becomes Eclectic and KEXP in

Seattle. The band has also performed at the Austin City Limits Music Festival. Having received outstanding reviews and having

toured the UK, the US and Continental Europe in support of the album "Our Eternal Ghosts", Steven Collins returned home to

face what would seem to be the destruction of the band and what would ultimately be the end of his marriage to his wife and

band-mate. DEADMAN went quiet, in the beginning of its rise.

But much like the Phoenix, Steven Collins, with the support of his current band mates, arose from the ashes of the former

DEADMAN and with a blazing fire in his songwriting, he never lost sight of faith, and he slowly rebuilt his vision of the perfect

band.

Enlisting powerful Austin veterans, Jacob Hildebrand (Miranda Lambert, Tommy Shane Steiner) on electric guitar, Kevin McCollough

on acoustic guitar and backing vocals (George Devore, Matt Powell), Lonnie Trevino Jr. (Monte Montgomery, Mike Zito) on

bass, Kyle Schneider (Roky Erickson, Ian Moore) on drums, and Matthew Mollica (Chris Brecht, Rock Bottom Choir) on Hammond

B3 Organ, the band's chemistry accompanied by the songs, personal pain, and faith turned DEADMAN into musical steel.

The Saxon Pub is considered to be much like a musical church by the six-piece band. All band members agree, the historical

venue's strong spiritual nature was a key factor that brought back DEADMAN's lead singer and primary songwriter Steven

Collinsfaith in the music again. “When I started to reform DEADMAN, I did so with very little expectations. The guys that were

joining had more passion than I did at that time. When we secured a small residency at The Saxon Pub, I didnt think much

would come of it. But people started showing up, and they stayed and each week the audience was getting larger and they

seemed to really be listening and taking in what we were doing. After a while, I realized that what I was doing was not in vain,

but was giving people, including myself, an indefinable hope.”

The club was the anchor of the band's rebuilding period. Where souls were healed, stories of faith were shared, and the belief

of the music was resurrected. It would make sense that this band would find comfort at The Saxon Pub. The reputation that the

venue and its owner, Joe Ables, have for developing and nurturing true talent is preserved in musical history today. These live

recordings caught the magic of DEADMAN at a very special moment in their career. It's honest, it's full, it's inspirational, and it

just makes you feel like you've been reborn.

Look for the Deadmans new studio album in 2011, Take Up Your Mat And Walk.

 

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Average Rating : 4.7              Total Reviews: 3


Deadman  01/10/2002            
Robert the Argentine
man, if you dig on that cool sh*t, then you'll dig Deadman. if you like Western cool sh*t, then you'll like them even more. if you like ambient Lanois-style tex-mex sh*t, well, then you'll dig these guys a lot. This EP [Cuatro Canciones] is great. It's in my player a lot....and you should check out their recently release full length album Paramour. it's cool sh*t.
Deadman  09/28/2001            
Colin Maycock
According to Deadman's chief wrangler, Steven Collins, the band aspires to "feel like a really great Clint Eastwood western." By this, it is assumed, Deadman wishes to sound windswept, violent, and cheap. If that was Deadman's intention, it has failed miserably. While Cuatro Canciones is undoubtedly aloof and maybe even a little mysterious, it is, by far, much more pleasant than mean. As the title suggests, the c.d. consists of four songs, each of which is marked by the band's distinctly somber sensibility. Overall, Deadman's sound is one of soft yearning, marked in places by plangent guitars that flare like sheet lightning in the darkling gloom of brushed drums and gently rolling bass. Collins' plaintive vocals nestle in a gown of crushed velvet that not only caresses it, but also helps to draw attention away from its infrequent weak moments. While some may quip that the band sounds like the Cowboy Junkies spaced out on morphine and Quaaludes, many of its tunes have a dark delicacy that the Canadian combo hasn't attained for years.
Deadman  05/22/2001            
Colin Maycock
According to Deadman's chief wrangler, Steven Collins, the band aspires to "feel like a really great Clint Eastwood western." By this, it is assumed, Deadman wishes to sound windswept, violent, and cheap. If that was Deadman's intention, it has failed miserably. While Cuatro Canciones is undoubtedly aloof and maybe even a little mysterious, it is, by far, much more pleasant than mean. As the title suggests, the c.d. consists of four songs, each of which is marked by the band's distinctly somber sensibility. Overall, Deadman's sound is one of soft yearning, marked in places by plangent guitars that flare like sheet lightning in the darkling gloom of brushed drums and gently rolling bass. Collins' plaintive vocals nestle in a gown of crushed velvet that not only caresses it, but also helps to draw attention away from its infrequent weak moments. While some may quip that the band sounds like the Cowboy Junkies spaced out on morphine and Quaaludes, many of its tunes have a dark delicacy that the Canadian combo hasn't attained for years.
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