D.C. Bloom








D.C. Bloom
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D.C. Bloom is a new man these days. After suffering a stroke during songwriter’s night at the San Marcos, TX music hall Cheatham Street Warehouse in August 2010, Bloom decided to turn over a whole pile of leaves. So nasty old habits were discarded and healthy ones embraced. After he kept hearing friends say, “You sure are a new man,” he knew he’d found the title of the album he’d been recording when health issues sidelined him for five months. 

When D.C. returned to South Austin’s Byrd House Studio, he was, indeed, a new man ... with a brand new song. Another Day, the first song he’d written after regaining his fingerpicking touch and singing ability opens New Man. It’s a rollicking celebration of life and a thankfulness to have “ ... another day to pick and grin, another day to deal me in,” as D.C. sings over a joyous amen choir and a gospel wall of saxophone, mandolin, fiddle and banjo sound. It’s a newfound perspective grounded in old-time religion. 

New Man, Bloom’s third solo release and coming on the heels of 2010‘s 5-song EP Cinco de Star-Oh!, finds D.C. bringing an array of styles to the easy way with words that has earned him praise as a unique songwriter who won’t be confined ... or easily defined. Bloom’s Americana is a broad musical and thematic landscape stretching coast to coast. It’s not the same-old, same-old concrete interstate lined with familiar, but boring franchises; it’s the memorable scenic route of a two-lane blacktop meandering through the land of heart and hope. 

From the swinging clarinet-driven ode to donatable footwear, Dusty Wingtip Shoes and the haunting song of a lover’s longing On That Primal Shore, to the swamp rock sound of Oma’s Secret Garden, a ‘Why can’t Tea Partiers and Bleedin’ Heart Liberals all just get along‘ desire expressed in Points of View or the 50 ways to waste time watching mindless TV enumerated in a Sitcom world, Bloom’s latest release is a fun, yet thoughtful roadtrip that the listener will want to travel time and time again. Joined once again by some of the finest musicians and coolest voices Austin has to offer, New Man features contributions from the likes of Warren Hood on violin and mandolin, Chip Dolan on keyboards and accordion, John Mills on flute, Dave Scherr and Greg Whitfield on lead guitar, LeeAnn Atherton (vocals - Dusty Wingtip Shoes, Yes, Indeedy) Mo McMorrow (duet on Sexual Tension), Jana Pochop (vocals on Fits and Starts) and Elizabeth Wills & Kristin DeWitt (vocals on Sitcom). 

 

D.C. BLOOM'S SONGS HAVE AN INTELLIGENT CUTTING EDGE, FROM OUTRAGEOUSLY CLEVER TO POIGNANTLY THOUGHT PROVOKING. HE'S A GREAT ENTERTAINER AND A RECOMMENDED LISTEN.  Lloyd Maines 

LISTEN TO THE SWINGINGLY ECLECTIC NEW MAN AND I DARE YOU NOT TO DIG D.C.’S UNAPOLOGETICALLY UN-P.C. POINTS OF VIEW, DELIGHTFULLY SKEWED WIT AND WIRY WORDPLAY, APPARENT SEXUAL TENSION AND DATED SITCOM ADDICTIONS AND - JUST WHEN YOU LEAST EXPECT IT - DISARMING HEART, SINCERITY, AND OPTIMISM.         Richard Skanse, Editor, Lone Star Music magazine

 

[email protected]    http://www.dcbloom.com 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Average Rating : 5              Total Reviews: 1


D.C. Bloom  03/20/2009            
mjm
D.C. Bloom, began his career by competing with his father, Vernon, singing as they worked the fields in NW Ohio on the Allis. Leaving the farm to explore other opportunities he added a guitar to his music and soon writing his own material. After a brief stint in Washington, D.C. he moved to San Antonio where his music career has come into full BLOOM. In this CD he reflects on his life and the life of other Texans from San Antonio to its borders. Keep up the good work, David. Aunt Marilyn
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