Shelley King




















Shelley King
No Video Available
In Austin’s exalted music scene, Shelley King ranks among the royals; in 2008, she even received a title: Official State Musician of Texas from the Texas Legislature. But she wouldn’t think of resting on her laurels — not when there are so many songs to sing and stages to conquer. With her new album, Building A Fire, releasing Aug. 26 on her own Lemonade Records label, she’s poised to reign over legions of roots music fans. King co-produced Building A Fire with Subdudes John Magnie and Steve Amedee, with whom she also recorded her lauded 2009 release, Welcome Home. Together, they capture her warm, earthy Americana style via 10 originals, one traditional and one cover: a Larry Campbell-penned spiritual previously sung by Levon Helm. It’s a soulful sound, rooted in southern gospel-blues mixed with the Gulf-borne humidity of Louisiana, the river loam of Muscle Shoals and the hot springs of her native Arkansas, with a little Texas country bubbling underneath. Tracked mainly at Magnie’s studio in Fort Collins, Colo., with additional recording in Austin and Muscle Shoals, Building A Fire features guest appearances by fellow Austin royals Carolyn Wonderland, Cindy Cashdollar and Warren Hood, along with sometime Subdude Tim Cook. The core band is King on vocals and guitar; Amedee on drums, percussion, mandolin and support vocals; Magnie on vocals, accordion and keyboards; Austin's heavy hitters Marvin Dykhuis on vocals, guitars, dobro and mandolin; and Sarah Brown on bass. They perfectly capture the essence of King’s personality: a self-made woman who carries herself with strength and assurance, even a little swagger at times, but who also has a sensitive, vulnerable side, and a well of compassion — along with the ability to still find wonder in the world. All of which make for powerful songwriting, the kind that gets noticed by artists such as Lee Hazlewood, who recorded King’s “Texas Blue Moon” with Nancy Sinatra after he heard King’s version on the radio while driving through the state. King also has appeared with Wonderland on the world-renowned PBS series “Austin City Limits,” as well as on stages throughout the United States, Europe and Japan. Since quitting a sales job to pursue music full time in 1998, she’s had many magical career moments, including befriending the Subdudes, one of her favorite bands, by arranging to open for them around the country. The tension between spirituality and sexuality — both major aspects of the human condition, she observes — is almost a theme permeating the album, played out amid her gospel influences and rootsier renderings.The stage for that duality was set when she began singing as a toddler. Following her parents’ split and her mom’s remarriage, King wound up in Houston, then Amarillo, where she landed in the children's choir at her grandmother’s church. After another stint in Houston, her mother divorced again, and King wound up with her other grandmother back in Arkansas. She found salvation — literally — in a one-room country church, where she built a social life, gained solace from familial turmoil and soloed weekly. Sometimes her uncles accompanied her on guitar. That’s when she started writing songs, inspired by her beloved Caddo River and a teenager’s hopes and dreams. King returned to Texas for college, self-financed via her own business. She planned on law school, but after working for a lawyer and starting her own band, she realized music, not law, was her passion. She gigged around Houston for a couple of years, then moved to Austin. By day, she worked as a sales rep; the rest of the time, she lived for music. One day she realized she would forever regret it if she didn’t at least try to follow her heart.She quit her job, went home and booked 11 gigs that day. She also formed her label, Lemonade Records. “I always liked that saying, ‘If life hands you lemons, make lemonade,’” King says. “And I felt like my corporate gig was a lemon and I split and I made lemonade.” She certainly has. In addition to being the first woman to hold the State Musician title (she preceded Willie Nelson), her accolades include several Austin Music Awards. But she values opportunities to collaborate with musical heroes — and friends — as much as any award. Her co-producers, of course, offer special inspiration. “They really care about doing what’s right for the song,” she says. “When I work with them, I feel like I’ve really found myself.”
Date Venue City State Note
No Tour Dates Available
10/28/2014 - Americana Star Shelley King Reveals Her Fateful Life-Changing Decisions [HNGN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW]  - Read More
10/23/2014 - SHELLEY KING ENTERS THE SCENE WITH "BUILDING A FIRE"  - Read More
10/14/2014 - Shelley King Brings Her Southern Gospel, Soul and Country Fire to Manhattan  - Read More
10/01/2014 - Building Tension: Building a Fire - Read More
More News
No Blogs Available
No Interviews Available
No Merchandise Available
Average Rating : 4.9              Total Reviews: 11


Shelley King  12/17/2009            
Buddy Magazine, Tom Geddie
Shelley King's SLOW-BURNING, sensual soul and gospel CD Welcome Home with three members of the Subdudes appeals to the flesh as much as to the spirit. The sound comes as much from the 1950s as it does the pew, and it's a fun, sometimes moving listen. King, the 2008 Official State Musician of Texas, is more known for her roots blend of rocked-up folk, country, bluegrass, and more. The New Orleans-based Subdudes blend blues,gospel,funk, and R&B into their own brand of rock. Three of the band's members, Steve Amedee, Time Cook and John Magnie, joined King on this CD with their harmony vocals, playing, and co-production skills. Amedee contributes drums, other percussion, and guitar; Magnie keyboards, accordion, harmonica, and percussion; Cook bass and percussion. Other musicians are Perry Drake (drums and other percussion), Jay Clear (guitar) and Jeff Stephenson (guitar). The CD is a bit inconsistent, perhaps, in the sense that the best songs are so good and the "worst" songs are only "average"; when it shines, it shines bright. Highlights include the title song with its simmering question about living the best life you can, wondering, "will your chariot be waiting, will the saints give you a ride, will the pearly gates be open so you can walk inside?". On the old-style soul and gospel sounding "Summer Wine", she's ready to reconnect disconnected lives. On the more upbeat "I Remember", she and the percussion-backed choir remember the promises a man made while he remembers what he wants to remember. King wrote all three of those. Then there's the slow, torchy "I Can't Make It Easy", a so-write with Magnie that celebrates love through the tears. On her upbeat "Falling Fast", she's ripe and ready to be picked from the vine. -Tom Geddie
Shelley King  12/17/2009            
Texas Music Magazine, Ethan Messick
Shelley King Welcome Home (Lemonade Records) Framing Austin-based songwriter Shelley King’s powerhouse voice — alternately capable of soothing, growling and languidly coasting on command — with the jangly groove of New Orleans bar-band vets the Subdudes is an idea that sounds good on paper. On record, it’s the best Texas/ Louisiana collaboration since crawfish enchiladas. Perhaps emboldened by her 2008 run as official State Musician of Texas, King transcends the straightforward countryblues of her past albums with something as sonically rich and thematically solid as any album this year. The message is as buoyant as the music, for the most part; shades of sadness aren’t unrealistically omitted, but they are overwhelmed in the joyful pulse of songs nodding to the spiritual, the personal and the inevitable intermingling of both that makes albums like this such good company when optimism is deeply felt (or sorely needed).
Shelley King  12/17/2009            
Texas Music Magazing, Ethan Messick
Shelley King Welcome Home (Lemonade Records) Framing Austin-based songwriter Shelley King’s powerhouse voice — alternately capable of soothing, growling and languidly coasting on command — with the jangly groove of New Orleans bar-band vets the Subdudes is an idea that sounds good on paper. On record, it’s the best Texas/ Louisiana collaboration since crawfish enchiladas. Perhaps emboldened by her 2008 run as official State Musician of Texas, King transcends the straightforward countryblues of her past albums with something as sonically rich and thematically solid as any album this year. The message is as buoyant as the music, for the most part; shades of sadness aren’t unrealistically omitted, but they are overwhelmed in the joyful pulse of songs nodding to the spiritual, the personal and the inevitable intermingling of both that makes albums like this such good company when optimism is deeply felt (or sorely needed).
Shelley King  12/15/2009            
No Depression
With touches of zydeco, blues, country, rock, soul and folk, Welcome Home, Shelley King’s latest record with members of the Subdudes (John Magnie, Tim Cook and Steve Amedée) is a spicy gumbo of roots style and sound for your ears. Growing from a few demos, the talented musicians eventually recorded enough material in John’s Colorado home studio to create a full-length album. There’s the country-tinged love songs like "Summer Wine" (the first single) and the boogie-woogie piano on "How You Make Me Feel," co-written with friend and fellow Sis Deville member, Floramay Holliday. A gentle R&B sound on "I Can't Make It Easy" and "It's Starting to Rain" exhibits another facet of Shelley’s voice and the various musical influences of New Orleans on the record. John Magnie’s accordion highlights "Everything's Alright," a song that Shelley wrote with NoLa musician Theresa Andersson as a reassurance in the wake of Hurricane Katrina while they were waiting to hear from friends and loved ones. Still, it’s the hymn-like, chill-inducing title track with its subtle harmonies and soulful vocals, complemented perfectly by the spiritual "Grain of Sand" that steals the spotlight. And an a cappella reprise of "Welcome Home" follows, ending the album with a scratchy, vinyl-like fade out
Shelley King  12/15/2009            
Texas Music Journal- John South
Shelley King, 2008 Official State Musician of Texas, presents us with a new offering, Welcome Home, that that not only highlights the flexibility of her vocal talent, but also underscores the craftsmanship that she and the Subdudes (John Magnie, Tim Cook and Steve Armedée) put into each and every song. One factor of craft that really standouts out in this recording is King’s minimalist approach to instrumentation. She doesn’t overpower a song with excessive instrumental support. In fact, the title song opens with a simple acoustic strum that supports the power of the vocals (which are absolutely awesome). The wailing undertones provided by the accordion and percussive support of the other instruments paints a picture of old time gospel that is quite engaging. Another minimalist song is King’s, “I Remember”. Basically using vocals, drums, and a touch of harmonica, King draws you into the energy of the song. The crispness of the recording allows the listener to feel every bit of the drum work. Each element balances the other perfectly. Where fuller instrumentation is provided, King ensures that a musical balance is maintained. This balances allows her to take us on a musical journey that includes gospel numbers (Welcome Home, Grain of Sand), south Texas zydeco influenced melodies (Everything’s All Right), bluesy numbers (I Can’t Make It Easy), country-influence (How You Make Me Feel, Falling Fast) and even a reprise of “Welcome Home” that emphasizes the old-timey nature of the song through a simulated early radio sound. Each number supports the next in the album, though they may be of completely different styles. “Summer Wine” is a song that has received international air play already. However, there are many songs on this album that should be getting radio time. A song like “Asking Too Much” exudes the Texas sound. A beautiful melody is supported with great vocals and accordion work; one finds themselves transported into a Texas frame of mind. “Grain of Sand” has a folksy gospel sound that draws you into the song with the deep bass vocal backup and the excellent organ work. King shows the flexibility of her talent in this album. Going beyond the fact that she was the first woman selected for the post of Official State Musician of Texas, in Welcome Home, King shows that she is a master song craftsman; perfect instrumentation for the mood of her songs, supported by a fantastic cast of musicians. This is definitely an album to pick on your holiday gift list!
Shelley King  12/15/2009            
Austin Chronicle- Margaret Moser
Welcome Home (Lemonade Records) A new Shelley King album is always occasion to celebrate and guaranteed to spin at least a couple of songs into the stratosphere. Welcome Home isn't just a pleasant sounding homily; it's back-to-back killer tracks start to finish, with songsmith King's full-custom gospel voice matched with fellow co-producers and Subdudes John Magnie, Tim Cook, and Steve Amedée. Hers is such a divine rendering of compositional craft that the lengthy wait between albums is worth it. She's the player who can hit all the balls, from bluesy balladry ("It's Starting to Rain") and gospel ("Welcome Home") to zydeco ("Everything's All Right") and country swamp pop ("Asking Too Much") with righteous force and, here, spare instrumentation that only enhances the music. One of these days, some singer will make Shelley King a wealthy woman. Meanwhile, her sweet Texas honey soul is still ours to savor.
Shelley King  06/20/2008            
madeline+co+subdudes
Her music is great! I only saw her once but that was enough to tell me how good she is.Great voice and she's a great gutairist
Shelley King  05/06/2004            
tomlandry7
heck i'll write a review! that is one kickass c.d. ya'll. lowdown blues, country, cajun and rock and roll. shelly has one fine voice !
Shelley King  11/01/2002            
D Campbell
This woman is awesome. I've been an fan of hers for years. She lights up the crowd everytime she gets on stage. Her CD is perfect for when you're in the mood to listen to some pure Texas music.
Shelley King  04/28/2002            
[email protected]
I just recently was introduced to Shelly's music by my son and daughter-n-law, and I thought man, why I haven't I heard this girl before, what a great voice!! Hope to hear a whole lot more from her.
Add Review   More Review


giresun escort sakarya escort tekirdağ escort Odtülüler DershanesiAnkara Temel Lise Ankara Temel Lise Kız Yurtları Ankara Ankara Kız Yurdu Ankara Kız Öğrenci Yurtları SRC Bilgisayar Notebook Servisi